James Webb images to CHANGE understanding of universe: 'Exceeded wildest expectations!'

Date:


Webb’s first full-colour image was published at 10.30pm yesterday, with more to be unveiled this afternoon. US President Joe Biden did the honours at a preview event at the White House which was live-streamed by NASA TV. Commenting before the pictures were published, Dr Olivia Jones, a Webb Fellow with UK Government agency the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) fully admitted she was struggling to contain her excitement.

She said: “The Webb data is going to give us a fundamental change in our knowledge of the universe.

“It’s such a versatile and fantastically sensitively telescope that we’ll hopefully be able to see the very first light ever in the universe.

“So from that ‘let there be light moment’ when the light switch is on and before was the cosmic Dark Ages.“

No telescope had ever been able to go back that far, Dr Jones stressed.

It will also reveal nearby solar systems, and Earth’s own solar system and nearby planets, in stunning detail.

Dr Jones said: “We’ll be able to see not just the images and pictures but we’ll also be able to see spectra, which is essentially rainbows of light.

JUST IN: Sturgeon’s independence dream crushed as UK unveils energy plan

“And I think we’re also going to gain a lot of new questions, where we can explore new things, and I can’t wait.

“It is a humongous leap forward, I feel like a kid in a candy store.

“The possibilities are endless and I am much more excited about tomorrow than I was this Christmas when it was actually launch day when I was absolutely terrified.

“It’s exceeding our wildest expectations, it is doing much better than our best estimates. It is more sensitive, it got better calibration, so we can see deeper, faster and I’m very excited by this. The discovery is going to be enormous.”

The James Webb Telescope was launched on Christmas Day, 2021 amid a blaze of publicity.

Its vastly superior infrared resolution and sensitivity will enable it to see objects much too old, distant, or faint for the Hubble Space Telescope.



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Share post:

Popular

More like this
Related

Stacey Solomon and Joe Swash 'in running to replace Holly and Phil after talks with ITV'

According to a source, This Morning executives have...

England fans split over three choices for next manager as they back Gareth Southgate sack

A quarter-final finish is possible, according to 31.1...

Queen was ‘baffled’ by ‘hands on’ parents Kate and William as royals 'refuse nanny'

Christine asked the royal expert about how the...

Germany sparks fury after 'luxury' move on gas price: 'Will do everything we can'

Europe's biggest economy is trying to cope with...